Words of Candor

Losing a loved one is an incredibly emotional time, and is often made more difficult by time-sensitive tasks like funeral arrangements or turning off streams of income like Social Security or pensions. Then you may learn you have inherited assets that come with additional taxes for you.
Early on in your efforts toward retirement savings, it’s easier to accept market volatility given the potential for growth over a long period of time. When actually preparing to retire however, your mindset needs to change. You are no longer looking only for the best performing investment, but for the most consistent investment. In retirement, volatility has the potential to accelerate the depletion of your assets, especially during a declining market, and since statistics show most 65 year olds will live to be 85 or 90, you need your savings to go the distance.
Saving for college is very similar to saving for retirement. In both scenarios, we aim to have a certain amount of money put away by a specified period of time before beginning withdrawals. Here’s three things to keep in mind when saving for college:
In the U.S., more than 189 million Americans have at least one credit card, and on average, most consumers have four with an average balance of about $8,400. In our experience, most credit card debt stems from two issues: either someone doesn’t have a budget and has overspent, or they do not have an emergency savings for when a major expense comes up. Let’s talk about that second reason today.
One of the greatest retirement fears people have is outliving their money. Rather than focus on the fear, let’s focus on making sure that doesn’t happen. Here are a few tips:
Below are four important questions to ask yourself before collecting on social security: