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Words of Candor

Like all good financial advisors, we work hard to facilitate thoughtful dialogue, listen carefully, broaden perspectives, and act as financial therapists, all in an effort to come up with smart financial strategies to optimize your money.
At least once a year we meet with our clients to talk about everything BUT finances. Why? Because the better we know you, the better we can support you.
Almost two months into this extraordinary pandemic, and I am more thankful than ever for an infrastructure that allows us to continue with business as usual here at CandorPath. In these past weeks, we have been reiterating these five points to all of our clients:
A recent article shined a light on how Warren Buffet prioritized wealth ethic over work ethic. Intrigued, I came to understand that wealth ethic pertains to the idea that the pursuit of money over the importance of enjoying how you are making money is no longer the priority. We would all love to make a living by following our true passion, but it often seems too difficult to do. Minda Zetlin explains that “one of the main reasons passion-seeking has gotten such a bad reputation is the presumption that there’s only one passion out there for each of us, and that whatever it is may not always translate to something you can do for a living.” But is that really true?
We often talk with those who are in the “build wealth” phase of life about the importance of establishing good financial discipline. When you are at the beginning of this phase, looking years ahead to retirement, it’s difficult to really appreciate how much the extra money going toward your retirement plan or current debt will benefit you, but the rewards of your good habits will only compound over time, multiplying your wealth. There is no shortage of examples of millionaires who attained their wealth through hard work and financial discipline.